succeed

succeed 1 *follow, ensue, supervene
Analogous words: displace, supplant, "replace, supersede
Antonyms: precede
2 Succeed, prosper, thrive, flourish can mean to attain or to be attaining a desired end.
Succeed (see also FOLLOW) implies little more than this. Both persons and things succeed when they are effective in gaining their purposes or ends, in particular or in general; the term implies an antithesis to fail
{

the teaching that fosters these ends succeeds; the teaching which neglects them fails— Suzzallo

}
{

the little man had succeeded in disturbing the boy with his absurd proposal— Dahi

}
{

the revolt against the tyranny of mathematics and physics is justified by the fact that these sciences have not succeeded in explaining the phenomena of life— Inge

}
Prosper carries an implication of continued or long-continuing success; it usually also suggests increasing success. Only through the context is it clear whether the success is in the continuation or the increase of health, of wealth, or of well- being
{

prosper in business

}
{

Milenka was soon prospering. His coat came in soft and shining; his purr cleared and his eyes lost the milkiness that had clouded them— Stafford

}
{

did all the naughty things little . . . children were punished for, did them and prospered in body and mindLillian Smith

}
Thrive adds the implication of vigorous growth; it often also implies succeeding noticeably because of or in spite of conditions or circumstances stipulated by the context
{

plants that thrive in an acid soil

}
{

he worked hard and his business thrived

}
{

the children throve under good care and proper feeding

}
{

like most great revolutionaries he could thrive only in evil times— Shirer

}
{

states thrive or wither as moons wax and wane— Cowper

}
Flourish implies a period of vigorous growth and expansion (as in an institution, a business, an art, or a science) at or towards the peak of development or productivity and without signs of decay or decadence; it carries no suggestion of how far this growth will be maintained and sometimes by implication hints at a future decline
{

if physics and chemistry and biology have flourished, morals, religion, and aesthetics have withered— Krutch

}
{

a pleasant white-haired widow surrounded by many potted plants that seemed to bloom and flourish in the fertile climate of her disposition— Cheever

}
{

the sciences cannot fully flourish, and may be badly damaged, in a society which gives an increasing share of its resources to military purposes— Science

}
It is also used of an individual to indicate the period of his prime or time of high success
{

Spenser and Fairfax both flourished in the reign of Queen Elizabeth— Dryden

}
Analogous words: attain, achieve, gain, compass, *reach: effect, fulfill (see PERFORM)
Antonyms: fail: attempt

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • succeed — UK US /səkˈsiːd/ verb ► [I] if you succeed, you achieve something that you have been trying to do or get, and if a plan or a piece of work succeeds, it has the results that you wanted: succeed in sth »He is determined to succeed in the property… …   Financial and business terms

  • Succeed — Suc*ceed , v. i. 1. To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; often with to. [1913 Webster] If the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • succeed — suc·ceed /sək sēd/ vi 1: to come next after another in office or position 2 a: to take something by succession succeed ed to his mother s estate b: to acquire the rights, obligations, and charges of a decedent in property comprising an estate …   Law dictionary

  • Succeed — Suc*ceed , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Succeeded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Succeeding}.] [L. succedere, successum; sub under + cedere to go, to go along, approach, follow, succeed: cf. F. succ[ e]der. See {Cede}, and cf. {Success}.] 1. To follow in order; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • succeed — [sək sēd′] vi. [ME succeden < L succedere, to go beneath or under, follow after < sub , under + cedere, to go: see CEDE] 1. a) to come next after another; follow; ensue b) to follow another into office, possession, etc., as by election,… …   English World dictionary

  • succeed — late 14c., come next after, take the place of another, from O.Fr. succeder (14c.), from L. succedere come after, go near to, from sub next to, after + cedere go, move (see CEDE (Cf. cede)). Meaning to continue, endure is from early 15c. The sense …   Etymology dictionary

  • succeed — When it means ‘to be successful’, succeed is followed by in + an ing form, not (unlike fail) by to: • Some local preservation enthusiasts succeeded in getting the house listed as of architectural and historic interest E. Lemarchand, 1972 …   Modern English usage

  • succeed — [v1] attain good outcome accomplish, achieve, acquire, arrive, avail, benefit, be successful, carry off*, come off*, conquer, distance, do all right*, do the trick*, earn, flourish, fulfill, gain, get, get to the top*, grow famous, hit*, make a… …   New thesaurus

  • succeed to — index inherit Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • succeed — ► VERB 1) achieve an aim or purpose. 2) attain fame, wealth, or social status. 3) take over an office, title, etc., from (someone). 4) become the new rightful holder of an office, title, etc. 5) come after and take the place of. ORIGIN Latin… …   English terms dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.